Humanity’s Bargain with the Birds by Eric Lochridge

Red robin preening in the road,
pacing in a slight impression,

my front driver side wheel careens your way.
I see you, but I do not brake.

We have a deal, a covenant
unbreakable, perpetual as evolution.

You may stand in the street, sipping
welled rain, slurping a worm or two.

I may drive these highways
without slowing, without swerving,

sipping an americano, singing along
to a Counting Crows song of my choosing.

The terms require you to flit away, or hop,
as you prefer, before my tire might make

a bony wind chime of your head, before
I might wing you, so to speak.

I have trusted in that promise,
put my faith in our pact.

Today, old friend, what happened?

 

Eric Lochridge is the author of three chapbooks: Born-Again Death WishReal Boy Blues, and Father’s Curse. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in SlipstreamDIAGRAMMojave Heart ReviewHawaii Pacific Review, and many others, as well as anthologies such as WA 129 and Beloved on the Earth. He lives in Bellingham, Washington. Find him on Twitter @ericedits.

Lion’s Maw by Lisa Folkmire

Lion's Maw

 

Lisa Folkmire is a poet from Warren, Michigan. She holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts where she studied poetry. Her poems have appeared in many journals, including Up the Staircase Quarterly, Atlas & Alice, Glass, Gravel, Anti-Heroin Chic, Occulum, and Timber. She is also a reader for The Masters Review.

Email to My Boyfriend When Rent Is Due by Micaela Walley

My sweet,

Remember the first time you went down on me
in your mother’s house, when I knee’d you in the chin but you still kept going?
Remember how after we got tired of touching each other, we’d go outside
to lay on your trampoline after you’d swept all the sticks and thorns
off? That black polypropylene material never felt so soft and warm
between the holes of my socks. I felt the heat rising off our bodies, blending into
the world around us as we basked in the sun, a new kind of hot.
Those were the best afternoons. I loved you the most as you’d sync
your jumps with mine, letting me go higher and higher, until I hit my head
on the edge of your roof and we laid down to take another break. I asked
you if it was bleeding and you said no. I asked you to check again, and you did,
and you still said no. I can never pay you back for things like that,
or things like this, when you take the brunt of what I can’t face alone.
I know on days like today, you forget those kids on the trampoline,
sticky with sweat and sex and a little blood. I know how often I forget
them too. Do you think they’d be proud of how far we’ve made it?
Do you think they’d let us lie down with them and stare into the sun?
I don’t think they’d even notice we were there.

All my love,

 

Micaela Walley is a graduate from the University of South Alabama. Her work can be found in Gravel, Occulum, and ENTROPY. She currently lives in Hanover, Maryland with her best friend — Chunky, the cat.

Directions by Jeffrey Yamaguchi

Can you just get on
top and also let me breathe
it’s been a long day

Slice the tomatoes
it doesn’t matter how thick
just keep all the juice

See if you can get
a forming wave and then crash
across the sequence

Just one ice cube please
let that fucker melt on down
takes away the harsh

Pay close attention
to the last very sentence
you’ll find the right words

Remember that time
we met at that hidden spot
let’s do that again

Turn out the lights
tell me that one story
will it to my dreams

 

Jeffrey Yamaguchi creates projects with words, photos and video as art explorations, as well as through his work in the publishing industry. He can be found on Twitter @jeffyamaguchi and at https://www.jeffreyyamaguchi.com. His recent publications include Vamp Cat Magazine, Nightingale & Sparrow, Failed Haiku, Naviar Haiku, Memoir Mixtapes, formercactus, and Three Drops from a Cauldron.

In All My Memories Flowers are Taking the Place of Faces by William Bortz

instead of telling you my name / I will unravel my hands from my pockets / and show you what I have lost / those little eternities know me best / they dig their eager claws into my tender belly / and call me to be hungry / I am not ready / I am a removal / I often do not believe morning when it tells me it will arrive with newness in its small mouth / like the steady light of home turning the front porch into a lighthouse / I am uncertain / so do not consider it a blade / to your throat / when I tell you that I am unsure if our eternity will outlive the others / give pain a body / and it will press your arm between your shoulder blades / until you cannot hold who you love anymore / I’ve given pain a whole country / I have tilled its fields and fed the children / until they were plump and perspiring / I fashioned crude knives from steel  / and taught them to dance with the killing thing resting patient in their teeth / something I meant to learn myself / I’ve waited and waited and waited so long and now all I know is surrendering / I am frail and bleached / now I eat only what pain gives me / and slowly / in cool, fragmented light / I am forgetting your face

 

William Bortz is a writer and editor from Des Moines, Iowa. His work has been published in Luck Magazine, 8 Poems, Folded Word, Empty Mirror, The LOVEbook, and others.

Telephone by Jill Mceldowney

I am beginning to view the body as a well

I could shout Hello, Hello into—
call it a mistake, hang up

out of alarm, because
            tell me

what you thought you were doing answering
when you’ve been dead five whole years?

And is it really you?
How have you kept alive?

What have you grown
down there in the gloom of after like salt?

Perhaps I should say mine—the body is a salt mine.

And I never call
            but you answer anyway.

Was it ever cheerful?
The sound called ringing.

Don’t talk to me,
please

don’t tell me I need you

disoriented, buried alive,
            clawing your way up from the mouth of a cave to show me

the way home
            and tell me,

            what does this even mean? Tell me to spread open my palms, cut
another deck of cards face up—

these lines arch me far
from home.

            I cannot stop from coming—

are you my fate,
my annihilating angel?

Tell me about my love line, my one day call me
bitch. I love that hands on

unmaking: making
I must impossibly bloom
forth; that tallest mountain.

            I dial the dead and you answer.

Hand me the telephone, let me receive
your ice,
your hour of starving, your nude—promise me
I will die dark haired

and still—maybe one day the dead you and I will burn
buildings together for warmth. You will

            speak to me. Tell me about me.

I want to be believed.
Believe me when I say

            it is love that calls me
            to the cruelty of this world.

 

Jill Mceldowney is the author of the chapbook “Airs Above Ground” (Finishing Line Press) as well as “Kisses Over Babylon” (dancing girl press). She is a cofounder and editor for Madhouse Press. She is also a recent National Poetry Series Finalist. Her previously published work can be found in publications such as Prairie Schooner, Muzzle, Vinyl, Fugue, and other notable publications.

landmines with silly eyes by Nicholas Alti

landmines with silly eyes

 

Nicholas Alti’s writing is influenced by chronic pain, depression, addiction, and an affinity for strangeness. He aims for an acceptable symbiosis of pop and pretension, and would like to see more cases of demonic possession. Nicholas is an assistant editor for poetry and fiction at Black Warrior Review. His recent and upcoming work can be found in DIALOGISTDream PopThe Hunger Journal, TERSE, and Yes, Poetry.

Cadaver by Tiffany Belieu

after the fall
a piece of death
was put inside

my bicep funeral
flex tell me
what belongs

to us entirely
threaded as we are
veins, blood and interstates

keeping contained
we grow slick
as the pulse of parts

covered in skin
I’m grateful as I look
at the plots,

wonder who is left
whole, who
spared a bone,

a heart, a lung, a marvel,
bodies magnificent
in their expansion

 

Tiffany Belieu is a poetry late bloomer. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Meow Meow Pow Pow, Collective Unrest, The Cabinet of Heed, and Moonchild Magazine, among others. She loves tea and cats, and can be found on Twitter @tiffbot.

Freedom Song by Alcian Lindo

Freedom Song

Alcian Lindo is a poet, singer and songwriter from Oakland, California. She studied English and Music at UC Davis and is currently working on her MFA in Creative Writing with an emphasis in Poetry from Mills College. When she is not in class, writing or singing, she is advising high school students within the Oakland Unified School District, ensuring that they are college and career ready. Alcian is currently working on her first book of poetry to be published in the near future.

Uncle Lazarus has a magic trick by Cheyenne McIntosh

he’s come to live with us now that he can’t go home
after he tried to set fire to Mary and Martha in the middle of the night,
weeping about how his old man touched him, back in the Old Country

now there’s a restraining order and a court date, so Uncle sleeps
at the foot of my bed, spilling his drink in my bedsheets
and telling stories from day-trips to the family lake

he wakes me up early this morning, with a treasure to show me:
I follow him through the house, hearing Bathsheba’s breath through the walls
as she sleeps, knowing the rules of being alone with Uncle

there’s an overturned glass waiting for us on the bathroom counter:
inside a cluster fly, the kind that slips in through our windows for winter
before dying, leaving behind a honey smell and their eggs within our walls

these are easy flies for trapping – they float lazily from room to room,
easier to catch and kill with their speed and size – and Uncle has drowning plans,
carefully lifting the glass to insert a straw filled with water, his dirty finger

a stopper until the placement is right and he rains down his prey, the fly
struggling at first before giving up – its tiny insect lungs filling with water,
its delicate wings wet and heavy and immobile – and this is the first living thing

I have ever watched die. Uncle watches my face, his dirty finger tracing the
tears on my lips before he pulls a salt shaker out of his pajama pocket,
the one he uses at night for his tequila game, licking his hand before shooting back

he buries the fly in the salt and tells me the story about that time
he tried to teach my mother to swim in the lake and she almost drowned
because he was drinking and all little girls know how to swim in the Old Country

it’s easy to drown, he explains as the salt dries up the water,
the cluster fly now awake again and climbing out of its salt-grave

 

Cheyenne McIntosh is an undergraduate at Franklin College, where she writes about gender-queer studies in science fiction. She’s the Leading Poetry Editor of Brave Voices Magazine and an editorial intern for Juxtaprose Magazine and Sundress Publications. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in carte blanche, Likely Red Press, Digital Americana Magazine, Small Po[r]tions, and elsewhere. In 2018, she was named as one of Indiana’s Best Emerging Poets and received her first Pushcart Prize nomination. You can find her @crm_writes.